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All posts by Louise Plus One

DJ Poison

Martin Poison has been into vinyl mixing since the age of 14, DJing out since 15 originally under the name ‘Darkside’. Jungle & Oldskool pirate stations thru the ’90’s were his main inspirations, later branching out into tekno/gabber as the drum & bass scene of the early 00’s became more MC based.
Today, Poison continues to push all factions of dark edge rave music, be it 4/4 or breakbeats.

For Distant Planet Martin will be dropping a ruff set of 92-94 darkside Jungle & Hardcore bangers, peppered with some fresh new generation wax made in the same oldskool style.

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DJ Realer

 

 

Music has always been a big part of Dj Realer’s life from a very young age. But it wasn’t until December 2010 that he decided it was time to dust off an old pair of Numark’s and finally learn how to mix. it was an instant addiction, mixing everyday and building a strong collection of old school dance music.

January 2013 at the Euphoriom Nightclub in Acton would be the first time an audience would get a taste of his old school selection. Bookings then started to grow, and he developed an insatiable appetite for DJing. Dj Realer was lucky enough to have a great group of friends who also shared his passion for underground dance music. They would then go on to form the Beautifully Crafted Jungle crew, and a page on Facebook that has put the old school jungle scene back in the picture.

When the page “Long Live Beautifully Crafted Jungle!” grew popular, it was clear that the crew should start putting on events. You can also find Realer and the Beautifully Crafted crew on the jungle train on a Sunday for their bi weekly show.

DJ Realer has been lucky enough to take his DJ skills out of the country, blessing new crowds From Europe to Asia.
You may have heard him play at events in the UK such as Distant Planet, Rupture, Jungle Syndicate, Launch, Destiny, Hogsozzle Festival, to name a few.

He has been known to have the most eclectic taste in music out of his crew. Find him spinning Hardcore, Jungle, Breakbeat, Techno, Trance, House, Acid, Electro, Italo, Funk and Disco.

One of his most treasured memories in the DJ scene would be when he was lucky enough to play alongside the legend, Tango.

DJ Realer Soundcloud

Beautifully Crafted Jungle Soundcloud

 

 

Nucleus

 

A DJ since 1986 and long time Paradox collaborator Nucleus has released on legendary labels such as Reinforced, Metalheadz, Good looking and Samurai as well as his own imprint ‘Esoteric’co-run with Paradox which is an exclusive outlet for their material.

Immersed in early Hip Hop culture he started mixing and scratching Hip Hop,Electro and Funk breaks after being influenced by DJ’s such as Grandmaster Flash, DJ Cheese and Double D and Steinski’s ‘The Lessons’ mixes.This led on to buying a 4-track tape recorder and creating break mixes and Hip Hop tracks with local MC’s,and playing at local parties.
When the rave scene kicked off he started going to clubs like the Dungeon, Crypt, Telepathy, Roller Express and then later Paradise club (AWOL).Getting into House and early breakbeat rave, DJing at parties and raves and staying with the music as it evolved through Hardcore,Jungle to Drum and Bass.

His first vinyl outing was in 1992 on Brain records, a B-side track called ‘I Can’t Stop’ on The Raw And Ready EP and in 1996 started making tunes with Dev Paradox recording as ‘Noise’ and then ‘Nucleus’ releasing various 12″s and LP tracks of dark Jazzfunk Breakbeat inspired DnB/Jungle and deeper ambient sounds on various leading DnB labels.

This led to the creation of ‘Esoteric’ in 2002.
Also staying with his Hip Hop roots he released 2 BBoy break mixtapes with Break Dj Leacy in 2000 which have become classics in BBoy circles worldwide.
As well as DnB/Jungle he has always played a wide musical spectrum collecting Funk, Disco,B-Beats, Hip Hop, House, Techno, Jazz Reggae, Broken Beat and everything in between. His renowned DJ sets have seen him travel the globe.

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Originally hailing from Glastonbury, UK and nurtured on a strict diet of mixtapes, raving in fields and doodling in school books, producer, DJ and visual artist, Alex Eveson, has been making his journey through the deeper spectrums of drum & bass since the mid 2000’s.

After initially breaking into the scene as a designer (with artwork for labels such as Metalheadz/Exit Records), Eveson’s music soon became the centre of attention after Fabio debuted a selection of early productions on his BBC Radio 1 show in the summer of 2006. In the ensuing months, Eveson went from a little known name to one of the most featured Drum & Bass artists on UK airwaves, whilst his signature ‘soulful and groove driven’ sound found it’s way into boxes of DJs from all corners of the scene, gaining support from Goldie, LTJ Bukem, Bryan Gee, Grooverider, Marky, Shy FX, dBridge, Calibre, Marcus Intalex, Doc Scott, Total Science & more…

The next few years saw Eveson stacking up releases across a selection of the scene’s most prominent labels from original pioneers Good Looking Records, 31 Records and Creative Source, to new school taste makers Horizons, Critical and Shogun Ltd. In 2012, Eveson released his debut LP ‘The Last Summer Of Love’ on V Records, a genre bending album of influence and exploration.

After a brief hiatus DJing in the French Alps, 2014 saw Eveson re-emerge as Dead Man’s Chest (as a means to explore his original influence of early 90s rave tapes), producing a series of EPs for Ingredients Records that culminated in the 2016 release of the Trilogy Mixtape; a 90 minute collage of tripped out jungle revivalism. 

2017 marks the latest chapter in Eveson/DMC’s career with the launch of Western Lore, a record label which serves as both a channel for Alex’s musical and visual ideas, and a space for artists to truly explore their unique style and individuality.

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Discogs

 

In 1995 Coco Bryce started DJing hardcore and breakbeat, gradually switching to d&b and tekno a few years later. Mainly operating under his “DJ-Y” moniker (as part of the notorious ZMK Soundsystem) he also took his first steps as a producer, which resulted in his debut vinyl release in 2000 on the Obnoxious label of friend and fellow DJ/producer OBX.

By the late 00’s his focus had shifted more towards downtempo styles like hip hop and skweee, releasing a number of records and cassettes on such labels as Harmönia, Fremdtunes and his own Myor imprint

The last couple of years have seen him go full circle, playing and producing mainly jungle and breakbeat hardcore, running two sublabels specialized in said styles (Myor Massiv and Diamond Life), collaborating with the likes of Dead Man’s Chest, Tim Reaper and fellow Dutch junglist FFF and dropping a slew of EP’s and 12”s on various UK based labels including 7th Storey Projects, Fresh 86, Western Lore and Hypercharger

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Morgan OSL’s love of music goes back to the early 80s with the emergence of Electro and Hip Hop. In ’86 he moved to Manchester the home of the Haçienda and lived there until ‘92. During this time, he was buying House, Hardcore and Rave vinyl from Eastern Bloc, Spin Inn and Underground Records and DJ’ing small gigs with duo Mo2vation (Kevin F. and Lee ST Files). In ’92 he moved back to London and managed to secure a regular slot on Format FM after Swift & Zinc and played up to the stations demise. Rinse FM followed in the mid-nineties and he was a regular for a year or two. During this time, he also played at various local club night for Mad B the owner of Quayside Records. Fast forward to today and he’s recently held a weekly slot on the re-launched Dream FM UK and played for Rupture one of the UKs leading club nights for Drum & Bass and old school Jungle.

 

ant1

In the summer of 1995 a teenage Ant D-RINK, sick of being force fed a diet of watery dutch trance being played by the likes of Judge Jules on Radio 1, decided to scan the airwaves of South London for a more underground sound. Somewhere near the end of the dial in the midst of white noise and inane radio banter, he chanced upon a pirate station playing a type of music he’d soon find out, was known as happy hardcore. This station was the legendary Dream FM. For a short time he was fascinated by the uptempo kicks and cheesy vocals but a few of the DJs on the station were playing a different sound. Slower, with darker melodies and more Breakbeat. Hearing these sounds for the first time struck a chord in Ant’s brain and his passion for Oldskool rave sounds really exploded when he joined ‘the Oldskool mailing list’ where he gained a lot of knowledge and friends who’d been ravers back in the day. This lead to the scanning of many online lists of Oldskool records, before the days of Discogs and Broadband that let you could listen to things online and Ant would phone up the online sellers and ask them to play track after track on down the phone line, much to their annoyance and over a few of years he amassed a decent collection of tunes from 88-95, all at prices which seem like a bargain in comparison to the inflated prices of today.
ant3Having learnt to mix on a pair of belt drive Sound Labs turntables, Ant got his first gig playing Oldskool at the Kingston Mill pub in 1999. This was also the year he started going to Oldskool nights at the infamous Camden Palace and various others such as Raindance. In 2004 and wanting more DJ gigs, Ant took things into his own hands by started a night called Snaffle, playing a mixture of Oldskool and Nu-skool breaks. In 2006 he hooked up with the encyclopaedic DJ YT to do Gutter Monkey, which mixed up Oldskool alongside disco and darker electro and techno as well as some DnB. Having started with a bang both of these nights fizzled out due to the respective venues going out of business. A long break from promotion followed but Ant kept partying. Not having been to an Oldskool night for some time because he was sick of hearing the same tunes again and again, one day he went to his first Oldskool all-dayer, which was at the Tuffnell Park Dome. This was Distant Planet. Appreciating their ‘all killer, no filler’ approach to playing Oldskool, Ant became a devotee of their events and endeared himself to to the crew with his ‘not giving a sh*t’ approach to dressing up and getting a full face paint of the Distant Planet logo at their Twickenham event. In 2012 the opportunity to put on a party in a local venue fell into Ant’s lap and renewed his enthusiasm for putting on parties. In one week with the help of some equally passionate mates, ‘KLARTBEAT’ was conceived and a great party was had at a local venue in Hackney. ‘KLARTBEAT’ moved to a bigger better venue and hosted The Ragga Twins alongside Jerome Hill, a night which Distant Planet’s Hughesee described as ‘quite some achievement’. Further parties were had with Shades of Rhythm and Daddy Freddy taking to the stage but inevitably the venue shut it’s doors permanently, leaving KLARTBEAT in limbo. Ant can be found out and about dancing on one side of the decks or other playing a mixture of styles but mainly Oldskool. Why is he called D-RINK? You’ll have to check him and find out!

Richy2

Hue Jah Fink, a.k.a. Richy Hughes earned his first production stripes using an Amiga with the OctaMED software in 1991 where his interests in computer programming and music collided creatively.  Set amongst a backdrop of mixtapes, CDs and vinyl from the burgeoning underground, it was often the darker breakbeat sounds from the raves as well as the depth and hypnosis of ambient music that really caught his ear as he developed his sample editing and sequencing skills.

He soon began to DJ in various venues and outdoor raves across the south west of England, culminating in a residency at the legendary ‘Brunel Rooms’ Swindon where he would win over a steady following of eclectic music lovers with his uniquely varied selection of beats and guest DJs.

In 1999 he began his voyage to the capital city, and began working closely with London sound-systems ‘Headfuk’ and ‘Unsound’ as a DJ and also a producer releasing and performing music both solo and collaboratively.  Purely from being spotted scratching and blending unlikely selections at underground events, Richy has been asked to DJ for Raindance, numerous guest spots for arts station Resonance FM and more recently a residency at ‘The London Underground’ venue in Block 9 Glastonbury performing alongside reknowned acts such as Nicky Blackmarket, Hyper-On-Experience, 2 Bad Mice, Youngsta and Blawan.

It was his great experiences at Block 9 that drove him to direct and manage his own venue at Glastonbury 2015.  ‘Brainwash’ in Shangri-la featured political cinema, music and games during the daytime hours, and at night a rave with 360 degree original projections and music from DJ Flight, EZ Rollers, Emika, Scanone, Distant Planet’s own Louise+1 and Hughesee and many more.

Constantly pushing the possibilities of computer based audio production across multiple genres and under various aliases, he rapidly became known on the London scene as a respected source of technical advice and assistance to producers, teaching music production to children and adults alike and eventually establishing Binary Feedback Digital Audio in 2008.  Here he offers professional services to app developers, film makers, creative events companies as well as the working with many of the UK’s respected underground electronic labels such as Yellow Machines, Combat Recordings, Rag And Bone, Boka, Frijsfo Beats, Senseless, and the stateside Section8 / Plush Recordings group.

He would later be introduced to Rob Booth of Electronic Explorations to master his flagship 61 track compilation. It was here he impressed Emika with his skills, who asked him to master her second album project for Ninja Tune and has kept him on board for all her work since starting her own label. When a backstreet Hackney guy can compete with the big studios engineering for artists like Emika, Plaid / Black Dog, Kirsty Hawkshaw, Marcus Intalex, Milanese, King Cannibal, Machinedrum, DjRum, Boxcutter and Aaron Spectre, he must be doing consistently high quality work.

On his own musical productions he’s been no slouch, most notably working with the legendary vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw in 2009 when launching his own DIY digital imprint Binary Feedback Music. He has attracted DJ support and praise from the likes of The DJ Producer, Freq Nasty, Starkey, Jerome Hill, Warlock, Xhin, DJ Phantasy, Kissy Sell Out, Laurent Garnier, Danny Breaks and many more taste-makers across the globe.

Despite having progressed far from slicing up 8-bit breakbeats and atmospherics back at the birth of the 90s to the seemingly distant world of professional audio engineering and venue programming, the sounds of darkside rave, jungle and deep DNB have always been in his heart.

You can hear him revisit his roots and take you on heartfelt, progressive journeys through the vinyl crates live on Distant Planet TV.

 

www.binaryfeedback.com
Facebook – Binary Feedback Digital Audio

Treen

There are people who don’t want to hide their collection of electronic music hardware away in a pristine studio. There are people who, while plumbing a reserve of patience deeper than the Mariana Trench and going through countless iterations in their set-up, finally get each instrument to trigger in time and play in tune with all the other ones, making sounds they’re happy with in the process. There are people who then risk it all and take it outside. Out into the unkind and dangerous world. And make loads of fucking noise with it.

This photo is of my band TR-33N. It was taken by photographer Nadia Otshudi at the Music Day Festival 2014 in Shoreditch Park, London. I completely love that I’m whooping a rave war cry like some kind of madwoman and inadvertently pointing at a tower block. I’m wearing the finest t-shirt I own (thanks to the screen printing skills of ashes57) and I’ve had the bizarre cockney rhyming foresight to bring a packet of cheesey quavers along in case of a sudden attack of the munchies. At no live appearance have I ever suddenly wanted to eat; it makes no sense!

I’m lucky that our band grew out of the staunchly left-leaning, artistically imaginative and almost determinedly reckless UK sound system culture of the late Nineties and early Noughties. Many of those same energetic and dedicated people are still to be found on the party scene today, only now they’re putting on extraordinary events and festivals that operate within legitimate frameworks as well as outside them. And, if we’re very lucky, sometimes we get asked to come back and be a part of it. So I’d like to say: Thanks for having us.

Those who have experienced the sharp end of rave and squat scene logistics (’gaining access’ through broken windows, hard wiring into the mains by torchlight, lifting bass bins up five flights of stairs without making any noise) are not the kind to be put off by the extra faff it takes to facilitate a bit of hardware in the wild. The fact we need ages to set up, we don’t fit in the DJ booth, we need a proper sound check. The fact, in a nutshell, that we’re not DJs who can plug in a phono to mini-jack and be ready. For our part every time we take the live set out we pack up our entire studio including the rack it stands on, remembering to bring the little allen key that means when we set the rack up again the whole thing doesn’t fall straight down again onto our toes breaking about three and half grand’s worth of gear in the process, drive it a few hundred miles – did I mention get a babysitter for our two kids? – unload it all again, plug 50+ leads in, check every connection, check every instrument is working and is being triggered properly, get the rack into position, make sure we have got enough light and space to operate it all in, gaffer tape the set list to something, do a sound check, trouble-shoot the mix, play an hour and a half’s worth of completely live, inordinately loud and utterly banging techno and then do it all again in reverse to get it home again. All usually just for the cost of our travel. Frankly, considering the effort people have gone to for us all to have a dance back in the day, it’s a doddle: no-one is calling the police.

This photo was taken at the point in the set where finally everything was working as it was supposed to – like most other live acts, it’s usual for some vital bit of gear to immediately malfunction and for one or other of us to spend half the set fire fighting the problem in a blind panic while trying to act like it’s all fine. The sound was incredible. A massive slab of Virus hypersaw was tearing across the park. People were being drawn from all corners of it to see what was going on. People were hitting the dance floor. I was feeling really confident with the material and the machines. By this time there were no 8 year-old kids playing a cool new game of throwing fistfuls of sand and grit from the ground directly onto all the hardware, and no folks boom-bipping away on their djembes ever-so-slightly out of time with the beat, because I’d already told them all to seriously just fuck off now.

This photo shows the raw and happy face of hardware in the wild. I can’t tell you how good it feels.